The Metaphysics Of The Binding of Isaac

Which kind of a father would sacrifice his son? Which thought will send a father for such a mission, and how spiritually can always hide behind to most obscure deeds?

But before answering these questions, first a few remarks about the Bible: Some people relate to the Bible like a mythological text, others see it as a collection of beautiful literature, while yet others look at the bible as a codex of ancient moral laws.

There is, however, a totally different way, which is not in conflict with the other ways, but simply goes above, below or beyond which invites us to relate to the Bible as a dream. For a dream describes a higher form of reality but also speaks to us by using symbols that appear in our lives. In other words, it’s here but also comes from there. In a way, the Bible is a dynamic text which reflects the state of mind we are in.

So if the Bible is a dream, and we are the active dreamers, what do we see behind the words, the names, the figures, the mountains, the oceans, the animals, and if it is not just a collection of beautiful stories, what is the Bible really about?

The Zohar offers us an interesting scope in which we can see the Biblical story. The Zohar offers us to look at the biblical story like if it was a magnetic field in which different powers and qualities reveal their abilities.

For example, the Zohar offers us to see the binding story slightly different. Throughout the Zohar’s lens Abraham is not just a father of Isaac, but also a reflection of the infinite grace, in which the world was created, While Isaac, is not just the son of his father Abraham, but also a reflection of the laws of nature, (In Hebrew we see a direct correlation between the letters of his name, ישחק  – in English there is a low)

And according to the Zohar, through the binding of Isaac, we can see an inner spiritual picture in which the laws of nature submit themselves to the infinite grace. In other words, the laws of nature binding together serve one universe

We wish you all Shana Tova, a happy good sweet year, and if you have questions, remarks thoughts and wonders please feel free to write and comment.

This entry was posted in bible, living, stories by Eti Shani. Bookmark the permalink.

About Eti Shani

Eti Shani was born in Israel and has been teaching Hebrew for more than 10 years with a special interest and experience in ancient Hebrew scriptures and culture. She's also the author of a series of books for novice and intermediate Hebrew learners.

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